lunes, 23 de abril de 2018

Join CDC’s May 1 Vector-Borne Diseases Thunderclap #VitalSigns

Partner with CDC by joining the #VectorBorneDiseases Thunderclap!
On May 1, 2018, CDC will be releasing a Vital Signs report highlighting the nation's increasing risk of vector-borne diseases and what can be done to reduce those risks. Join us in sharing information to increase awareness about how we can all help take steps to address and stop the vector-borne disease threat. https://www.cdc.gov/vitalsigns/index.html #CDC #VitalSigns
Widespread and difficult to control, vector-borne diseases, spread through the bite of an infected mosquito, tick, or flea, are major causes of illness and death worldwide. The growing number and spread of these diseases pose an increasing risk in the United States. State and local health department and vector control organizations are on the frontlines for detecting, tracking and monitoring, responding to, and preventing diseases spread by mosquito, tick, and flea bites. However, according to a recent NACCHO survey, over 80 percent of US vector control organizations lack critical prevention and control competencies.
To better address current threats, like Lyme disease and West Nile virus, and ensure that we as a nation are prepared for the next one, we must:
  • Build or rebuild state and local capabilities and capacity,
  • Partner with public health stakeholders and vector control organizations to detect and respond to threats,
  • Develop and improve laboratory tests, and
  • Educate the public about how to protect themselves and their communities.
Vital Signs is a report that appears as part of CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Vital Signs provides the latest data and information on key health threats. Some topics include cancer, HIV/AIDS, prescription drug overdoses, antibiotic resistance, suicide, asthma, and global health.
JOIN the Vector-Borne Disease Thunderclap today
Thunderclap helps amplify social media messages by connecting partners and friends to share the same message at the same time through Facebook, Twitter, and Tumblr. The @CDC NCEZID Twitter account is hosting the Vector-Borne Disease Thunderclap, and you can join with this linkhttps://bit.ly/2JaHmjY.
PROMOTE the Thunderclap with your members on social media
Here are some sample social media messages that you are welcome to use as soon as possible.
Twitter/Facebook
SHARE CDC's mosquito- and tickborne disease resources
Share the following resources on your website.

Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)—Patient Version - National Cancer Institute

Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)—Patient Version - National Cancer Institute
National Cancer Institute

Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)–Patient Version



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What is prevention?

Cancer prevention is action taken to lower the chance of getting cancer. By preventing cancer, the number of new cases of cancer in a group or population is lowered. Hopefully, this will lower the number of deaths caused by cancer.
To prevent new cancers from starting, scientists look at risk factors and protective factors. Anything that increases your chance of developing cancer is called a cancer risk factor; anything that decreases your chance of developing cancer is called a cancer protective factor.
Some risk factors for cancer can be avoided, but many cannot. For example, both smoking and inheriting certain genes are risk factors for some types of cancer, but only smoking can be avoided. Regular exercise and a healthy diet may be protective factors for some types of cancer. Avoiding risk factors and increasing protective factors may lower your risk but it does not mean that you will not get cancer.
Different ways to prevent cancer are being studied, including:
  • Changing lifestyle or eating habits.
  • Avoiding things known to cause cancer.
  • Taking medicines to treat a precancerous condition or to keep cancer from starting.
See the following PDQ summaries for information about screeningdiagnosis, and treatment of oral cancer:

Oral Cavity, Pharyngeal, and Laryngeal Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version - National Cancer Institute

Oral Cavity, Pharyngeal, and Laryngeal Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version - National Cancer Institute
National Cancer Institute

Oral Cavity, Pharyngeal, and Laryngeal Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)–Health Professional Version


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Changes to This Summary (04/18/2018)

The PDQ cancer information summaries are reviewed regularly and updated as new information becomes available. This section describes the latest changes made to this summary as of the date above.
The summary was renamed from Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Prevention.
This summary was comprehensively reviewed and extensively revised.
This summary is written and maintained by the PDQ Screening and Prevention Editorial Board, which is editorially independent of NCI. The summary reflects an independent review of the literature and does not represent a policy statement of NCI or NIH. More information about summary policies and the role of the PDQ Editorial Boards in maintaining the PDQ summaries can be found on the About This PDQ Summary and PDQ® - NCI's Comprehensive Cancer Database pages.
  • Updated: April 18, 2018